Advanced Usage

Switching targets & sources

The to prop of <portal> and the name prop of <portal-target> can be changed dynamically with v-bind, allowing you to send content of one <portal> to a different <portal-target>, or switch the source of a <portal-target> from one <portal> to another.

<portal v-bind:to="name">
  Content will be dynamically sent to the destination that `name` evaluates to
</portal>

<portal-target v-bind:name="name">
  by changing the 'name', you can define which portal's content should be shown.
</portal-target>
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"Slim" - removing the wrapper

Vue components always need a single root element. Since <portal-target> can't know in advance weither or not it will receive content with more than one root element, it will render a wrapper element around the content to provide a single root node.

However, if you know that you will send content with a single root element only, you can use the slim prop to tell <portal-target> to render that element only and do without the wrapper element.

This can be useful if <portal-target>s wrapper element is creating problem for your styling.

<portal to="destination">
  <div>
    <p>This content has a single root node (the div)</p>
    <p>
      Therefore, we can tell the PortalTarget to do without a root element of
      its own
    </p>
  </div>
</portal>

<portal-target name="destination" slim />
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The slim property also works on <portal> components when the are disabled (see here).

Scoped Slots 1.3.0+

PortalVue can also be used with Scoped Slots! This allows you to send a scoped slot to a PortalTarget, which can then provide props for the slot content:

<portal to="destination">
  <p slot-scope="{message}">{{message}}</p>
</portal>

<portal-target
  name="destination"
  :slot-props="{message: 'Hello from the Target to You!'}"
/>
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Result:

<div class="vue-portal-target">
  <p>Hello from the Target to You!</p>
</div>
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Transitions 1.2.0+

You can pass transitions to a <portal> without problems. It will behave just the same when the content is being rendered in the <portal-target>:

<portal to="destination">
  <transition name="fade">
    <p v-if="hasMessages" key="1">You have {{messages.length}} new messages</p>
    <p v-else key="2">No unread messages</p>
  </transition>
</portal>
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However, if you use a <portal-target> for multiple <portal>s, you likely want to define the transition on the target end instead. This is also supported.

WARNING

This API underwent a significant change in the 2.0.0 release. Below, examples for both old and new snytax are given. Keep an eye on the version badges next to them.

New Syntax 2.0.0+

<portal-target
  transition="fade"
/>
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Here, the string 'fade' would be expected to be the name of a globally registered component that wraps a <transition> component (see Vue docs on reusable transitions). You can also pass a component options object or a constructor. We have more examples in the API docs.

Old Syntax >=1.2 <2.0

<portal-target
  :transition="{ name: 'fade'}"
  :transition-events="{ enter: onEnterCallBack }"
/>
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One important behaviour to know is this:

  • When the PortalTarget would render only one content element, a <transition> is created.
  • When it would render multiple elements, the rendered root wrapper element will be turned into a <transition-group> component instead.

Rendering outside of the Vue-App 2.0.0+

If you want to render your content to a place outside of the control of your Vue app, Portal-Vue also got your covered. It gives you a special <MountingPortal> component that mounts a <PortalTarget> to any element in the DOM - you just define it with a normal DOM selector.

It then provides the (auto-generated) name of the generated Target to its children through a scoped slot.

<div id="app">
  <MountingPortal mountTo="#widget" name="source" append>
    <p>Content for the Target</p>
  </MountingPortal>
<div>

<script>
  new Vue({el: '#app'})
</script>
<aside id="widget" class="widget-sidebar">
  This Element is not controlled by our Vue-App,
  but we can create a <portal-target> here with <MountingPortal>.
</aside>
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When <MountingPortal> is destroyed, it takes care of destroying the <PortalTarget>.

TIP

When the append prop is set, the Target will be mounted to as a child of the specified element instead of replacing it.

This is great if you want to mount more than one PortalTarget there, for example.

When append is used, <MountingPortal> will also remove the appended element when destroying the <PortalTarget>

targetEl - The Old Way 1.* only



 









<body>
  <div id="app">
    <portal name="" target-el="#widget">
      <p>
        PortalVue will dynamically mount an  instance of <portal-target>
        in place of the Element with `id="widget"`,
        and this paragraph will be rendered inside of it.
      </p>
    </portal>
  </div>
</body>
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WARNING

This feature had a couple of problems that were the trigger to revamp it for 2.0 as can be seen above.

It was both a bit buggy and made the code harder to maintain, so we extracted it into a separate component for 2.0